Dynamic Document Generator

Provides the following merging and conversion Smart Services:

  • PDF from single DOCX with Fonts
    • Convert multiple DOCX files into a single PDF. Please note that the translation from DOCX to PDF is not always 1:1. The template may need to be tweaked or simplified to achieve the desired results.
  • PDF from DOCX without Fonts
    • Convert multiple DOCX files into a single PDF. Please note that the translation from DOCX to PDF is not always 1:1. The template may need to be tweaked or simplified to achieve the desired results. This will not support fonts.
  • PDF from XSL-FO Transformation
    • Uses XSLT to convert an XML to XSL-FO which is then converted to PDF
  • PDF from HTML
    • Converts an HTML document into a single page PDF.
  • PDF from HTML Transformation
    • Uses XSLT to convert an XML to HTML which is then converted to PDF
  • Text Doc from XSLT
    • Uses XSLT to convert an XML to a plain text document (such as HTML, another XML doc, etc).
  • DOCX from XHTML With Styling
    • Converts a valid XHTML file into a DOCX, allowing you to provide your own template file for style reference. Useful for creating dynamic documents that are editable
  • DOCX Merge
    • Merges one or more DOCX files together. If a header or footer exists in any document, they will be removed during the merge process.
    • A configurable separator can be specified: none, line break or page break
Anonymous
Parents
  • For anyone using DOCX from XHTML a few useful notes for you: 

    • To access MS Word standard styles (like Title, Heading1, Normal, etc.) format your HTML body as so
      • Title Example: <p class="Title">Your Title Here</p>
      • Heading1 Example: <p class="Heading1">Heading Text</p>
      • Basically the point being is that you should us <p> tags for all of your text and specify the formatting class as the class
        • This will allow MS Word to register the style for the navigation pane
    • It's worth noting that although MS Word identifies the style applied to text, it will not use the default style of MS Word (this tripped me up for a while)
      • You should create a document in word with some styles applied and save as an HTML and grab the relevant CSS style definitions out of the CSS and put it in a constant or something that you add to the <head> of your HTML by default
      • Make sure that you set your CSS class names to p.<msWordStyle> (eg: p.Title, p.Heading1, etc.)
        • This will allow your class to both be recognized by MS Word and will allow you to apply a style to the text so that it looks decent on openning the document
      • It's also worth noting that the CSS created by MS Word has non-standard tags in it generally of the format "mso-style..."
        • You can remove these as they won't do anything for you and will just take up space
    • Also remember the main difference between XHTML and HTML is that all attributes must have "" around them!!!

    Happy document generation everyone!

Comment
  • For anyone using DOCX from XHTML a few useful notes for you: 

    • To access MS Word standard styles (like Title, Heading1, Normal, etc.) format your HTML body as so
      • Title Example: <p class="Title">Your Title Here</p>
      • Heading1 Example: <p class="Heading1">Heading Text</p>
      • Basically the point being is that you should us <p> tags for all of your text and specify the formatting class as the class
        • This will allow MS Word to register the style for the navigation pane
    • It's worth noting that although MS Word identifies the style applied to text, it will not use the default style of MS Word (this tripped me up for a while)
      • You should create a document in word with some styles applied and save as an HTML and grab the relevant CSS style definitions out of the CSS and put it in a constant or something that you add to the <head> of your HTML by default
      • Make sure that you set your CSS class names to p.<msWordStyle> (eg: p.Title, p.Heading1, etc.)
        • This will allow your class to both be recognized by MS Word and will allow you to apply a style to the text so that it looks decent on openning the document
      • It's also worth noting that the CSS created by MS Word has non-standard tags in it generally of the format "mso-style..."
        • You can remove these as they won't do anything for you and will just take up space
    • Also remember the main difference between XHTML and HTML is that all attributes must have "" around them!!!

    Happy document generation everyone!

Children